When I got online this morning, the first thing that popped up in my News Feed was the link to this Shane Claiborne article (http://www.esquire.com/features/best-and-brightest-2009/shane-claiborne-1209) by a friend of mine in South Africa. My heart got so excited for a number of reasons, that had very little to do with the content of the article. My excitement mostly had to do with the fact I think Greg and Shane would be rolling buddies if they lived in the same city.

Then I clicked on the link. Oh my! I needed to hear this word today. My soul thirsts daily for this kind of truth-telling and bread offering.

Here is a little bit of what I have been feasting on all day…

“One of Jesus’ most scandalous stories is the story of the Good Samaritan. As sentimental as we may have made it, the original story was about a man who gets beat up and left on the side of the road. A priest passes by. A Levite, the quintessential religious guy, also passes by on the other side (perhaps late for a meeting at church). And then comes the Samaritan… you can almost imagine a snicker in the Jewish crowd. Jews did not talk to Samaritans, or even walk through Samaria. But the Samaritan stops and takes care of the guy in the ditch and is lifted up as the hero of the story. I’m sure some of the listeners were ticked. According to the religious elite, Samaritans did not keep the right rules, and they did not have sound doctrine… but Jesus shows that true faith has to work itself out in a way that is Good News to the most bruised and broken person lying in the ditch.

It is so simple, but the pious forget this lesson constantly. God may indeed be evident in a priest, but God is just as likely to be at work through a Samaritan or a prostitute. In fact the Scripture is brimful of God using folks like a lying prostitute named Rahab, an adulterous king named David… at one point God even speaks to a guy named Balaam through his donkey. Some say God spoke to Balaam through his ass and has been speaking through asses ever since. So if God should choose to use us, then we should be grateful but not think too highly of ourselves. And if upon meeting someone we think God could never use, we should think again.” Shane Claiborne

Read more: http://www.esquire.com/features/best-and-brightest-2009/shane-claiborne-1209#ixzz0XSPKBnQB

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